CAMARAS Nikon DF Review

Nikon DF Review

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Nikon DF Review

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Nikon DF Review

35mm DSLR Nikon Df for photo purists introduced: Full-frame bolide without video function

With the 35mm DSLR Df, Nikon jumps on the retro bandwagon and brings a digital SLR camera onto the market that wants to concentrate on pure photography. Accordingly, a video function is missing, but there is a sealed magnesium housing and mechanical adjustment wheels for exposure time, ISO sensitivity and exposure correction. The Df supports all Nikkor lenses, even the very old non-Ai lenses thanks to the fold-out aperture driver.

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Many possibilities for image processing in the camera
  • Good optical viewfinder (but without manual focus adjustment aids)
  • Excellent image quality (but with weaknesses in resolution)
  • Allows the use of almost all Nikon-F lenses

Cons

  • Only available as a set with lens, high price
  • No video recording possible
  • Weak autofocus, especially in poor light
  • Retro design with untimely limited ergonomics

With the Df, Nikon, according to his own statements, makes a commitment to “pure photography”. The 35mm DSLR comes in the guise of an analogue SLR camera with a large number of dedicated control wheels, and does without video functions. Under the hood, however, there are state-of-the-art electronics, including the 16-megapixel sensor from the top-of-the-range D4 model. Df not only wants to build a bridge between the past and the modern in its design, but also functionally: it is the only digital camera to which almost every F-mount lens produced since 1959 can be attached. Can this bridge be built?

Nikon DF Review

The design of the Nikon Df is strongly based on the analog SLR cameras from Nikon. [Photo: Nikon]

Nikon DF Review

If you don’t like the silver case of the Nikon Df you can also buy it in black. [Photo: Nikon]

Nikon DF Review

The Nikon Df’s 35mm sensor comes from the D4 professional camera and has a resolution of 16 megapixels. It reaches a maximum ISO sensitivity of 204,800

Nikon DF Review

Exposure time, ISO sensitivity and exposure correction on the Nikon Df are set in the classic way using wheels. A small status display informs about further recording parameters. [Photo: Nikon]

Nikon DF Review

The lithium-ion battery of the Nikon Df holds out a proud 1,400 shots. The SD memory card also fits in the battery compartment. [Photo: Nikon]

Nikon DF Review

The Nikon Df has no connections or compartments on the handle side, only the cable entry can be seen for the power supply connection. [Photo: Nikon]

Nikon DF Review

On the other hand, the Nikon Df boasts connections for USB, HDMI, flash system and the universal connection for remote trigger, GPS, etc. [Photo: Nikon]

While the design of the Df is based on old analog SLR cameras from Nikon, the interior consists essentially of a mix of the D4 and D600. The splash-proof magnesium housing is provided with a rubber coating over a large area, which gives the necessary grip. At the same time, the Df with dimensions of approx. 144 x 110 x 67 mm is Nikon’s smallest and lightest FX camera with 765 grams (including battery). For the 35 mm sensor, the Japanese manufacturer does not rely on the high-resolution 36 megapixel sensor from the D800, but on the 16 megapixel model from the D4. The CMOS sensor enables an ISO sensitivity of 100-12,800 as standard, with extension even ISO 204,800 can be reached, one could only dream of this at analogue times. The Expeed 3 image processor is designed to provide high image quality and fast data processing. The autofocus with its 39 measuring fields, including nine cross sensors, is the same as in the D600. The Multi-CAM 4800 operates at up to -1 LW ambient light, the 33 central measuring fields support luminous intensities from F5.6 to F8, with the latter aperture only supported by the seven central measuring fields. This allows focusing even with low-light lenses with teleconverters. The TTL exposure is measured using an RGB sensor with 2,016 pixels and a working range of 0 to 20 LW.

Contrary to some rumours, the Df has a classic single-lens reflex viewfinder with pentaprism. With an image field coverage of 100 percent, it enlarges 0.7 times, whereby the small exit pupil of 15 millimeters is less suitable for spectacle wearers. The viewfinder has AF markers, a grid that can be displayed, and a status indicator. Nikon also found room on top of the camera for an admittedly small status LCD display with activatable lighting. Parameters such as exposure time and ISO sensitivity as well as exposure correction are always in the photographer’s sights thanks to the manual adjustment wheels. The control dial on the front of the camera is used to adjust the aperture if the lens does not have an aperture ring. As a special highlight, an aperture driver for non-Ai lenses can be unfolded on the bayonet. The minimum and maximum aperture as well as the focal length must be communicated to the camera via the menu setting, whereby several default settings can be saved here for faster access. This enables the Df to measure open-aperture exposures precisely and to provide a focus aid by means of the autofocus sensors. Manual exposure and aperture priority are then supported. According to Nikon, non-Ai lenses were built between 1959 and 1977.

Nikon uses the SD format for the memory card slot, which is located in the battery compartment; compatibility with SDHC and SDXC is of course guaranteed. The lithium-ion battery EN-EL14a should be sufficient for long 1,400 shots, although this is also due to the absence of an integrated flash unit. The Df has both an ISO flash shoe with Nikon TTL support and a flash sync socket. The up to 1/4,000 fast shutter is designed for a minimum of 150,000 releases, the flash sync time is 1/200 seconds. The control dial allows exposure times from 1/4,000 to 4 seconds, including the position for image synchronization. Longer shutter speeds can be achieved using the Bulb function, which also provides a T mode in which the shutter-release button does not have to be pressed permanently, but the exposure is stopped with the first press and the exposure stops with the second. The release has a remote release thread connection.

Even though Nikon concentrates on puristic, classic photography with the Df, it has a 3.2 inch (eight centimeters diagonally) color screen on the back that resolves fine 921,000 pixels. Here you can not only view the photos taken and operate the menus, but also Live View with contrast autofocus and face recognition, the Df. In addition, there is an HDR recording function, Active-D-Lighting, 5.5 continuous shots per second, a quiet shutter release mode, an electronic spirit level and a spot white balance measurement function in Live View. Since the Df has an HDMI connection with uncompressed live transmission, external recording devices can even record videos. The Df, on the other hand, does not have a dedicated video recording function, which means that no microphone is installed and no corresponding connection is available. But Nikon is not stingy with other interfaces. The USB port can be used to retrofit a WLAN adapter with live image transmission to a smartphone or tablet, and of course the Df can also be triggered remotely. In addition, the universal accessory connection provides the third option for remote triggering of the Df. A GPS receiver can also be connected here.

The camera is only sold as a set with the AF-S Nikkor 50 mm 1:1,8G SE. The lens is only available in black (with silver ring) and is also sold exclusively together with the Df. It is only a design variant of the well-known AF-S Nikkor 50 mm 1:1,8G.

Ergonomics and workmanship

Angular, a handle at best implied, but generously dimensioned adjustment wheels for exposure time, ISO number and exposure correction – the Df wants to be different from all current DSLRs. At first glance you might think that Nikon transplanted the technology of the top model D4 into the housing of the former professional camera F3. But appearances are deceptive: While the naked F3 didn’t weigh 700 grams, the Df weighs 765 grams, ready for use without lens, a little more, equipped with the set lens AF-S Nikkor 50mm F1.8G SE, it weighs a good 950 grams.

Nikon DF Review

The Nikon Df has a splash-proof magnesium housing with generous rubber leathering. [Photo: Nikon]

With the angular design and the analog-like adjustment wheels, Nikon wants to merge the world of film cameras with the digital world – the small “f” in the type designation stands for “fusion”. On closer inspection, however, the world of Df is divided in two: From the front and top she actually looks like a representative of the vanishing analog photography. The back side is almost identical to the professional model D800/D800E. The view through the viewfinder also feels very contemporary: the Df does not have a sectional image rangefinder, but at the touch of a button it fades in grid lines into the lush and bright viewfinder. For spectacle wearers Nikon could have lowered the exit pupil a bit. The distance between the eyes and the viewfinder eyepiece is only 15 millimetres – you can hardly get that close with glasses on your nose. Alternatively, the Df also shows the viewfinder image on the rear display in Live View mode. With a diagonal of 3.2 inches (about 8 centimeters), it is very luxuriously dimensioned, but can neither be folded nor swivelled.

Nikon DF Review

The Nikon Df has no video function as a puristic camera, but it does have an 8 cm screen for menu, image display and live view. [Photo: Nikon]

So most of the time you will take classic photos with the Df, looking through the viewfinder. And this feeling of “pure photography” from analogue times quickly returns – but by no means only in a positive sense. At first it may seem practical that the exposure time can be adjusted in M or S mode with a large dial. But that’s not so easy while you’re aiming at the motif. Nikon has provided it with a strong lock like the other adjustment wheels. The wheel can only be turned if the lock is held firmly pressed. Especially the ISO specification can hardly be adjusted with one hand – the left thumb has to hold the ratchet unlocked while the right hand turns the wheel. By the way, the program selector can only be turned when it is pulled out. Although these locks prevent something from accidentally moving, they also make it almost impossible to reconfigure the camera when looking through the viewfinder.

So it’s just right that Nikon has also equipped the Df with an adjustment wheel for thumb and index finger. The rear wheel is used by default to set the exposure time – if the time dial is set to “1/3 Step”. Now you can adjust the times in 1/3 EV steps, the timer wheel only knows whole EV steps. The front wheel sits classically on the front of the case – and makes it impressively clear why not only Nikon has long said goodbye to this design: A wheel protruding from the housing is much easier to adjust than in this traditional arrangement, where the wheel is simply placed on the front surface. In addition, the index finger has to reach around the strap eyelet in a complicated way in order to reach the front wheel. The main switch is similarly complicated to handle. It encloses the trigger, but has no gag. You therefore have to turn it with your thumb and index finger – practically it’s different!

Nikon DF Review

Exposure time, ISO sensitivity and exposure correction on the Nikon Df are set in the classic way using wheels. A small status display informs about further recording parameters. [Photo: Nikon]

As chic as the retro design may seem, it is not particularly ergonomic. This also applies to the only slightly indicated handle – it is simply too small for a camera with the dimensions and mass of a Df and does not offer sufficient grip. In addition, there is only little space in the grip bead for a battery that is inserted from below. The small energy dispenser type EN-EL14a has a capacity of 1,230 mAh, which is sufficient for about 1,400 recordings according to the CIPA standard. The Df certainly benefits from the fact that it does without an energy-hungry on-board flash. By the way, the battery compartment also accommodates the slot for an SD card, but it has to be locked with a twist lock in a classic but impractical way.

Nikon DF Review

Exposure time, ISO sensitivity and exposure correction on the Nikon Df are set in the classic way using wheels. A small status display informs about further recording parameters. [Photo: Nikon]

Nikon DF Review

The lithium-ion battery of the Nikon Df holds out a proud 1,400 shots. The SD memory card also fits in the battery compartment. [Photo: Nikon]

When it comes to the digital aspects, the Df is back on the cutting edge: the menus are typically Nikon extensive, but somewhat complex and nested. So it is only to be welcomed that the Df lists the menu commands that were called last. It also allows you to create and save custom menus, so you can simply hide commands you never need. The Df stores up to four different configurations, so the camera can be adapted to the respective requirements in a flash. What a pity that these individual configurations cannot be called up via the program selector – at least there would have been enough space for them.

Equipment

The Df has (almost) all the functions that professionals and ambitious amateurs expect from a camera in its price range. But with this camera, Nikon apparently didn’t focus on occasional snapshots – motif programs or even a fully automatic mode, the Df is completely denying itself in the sense of “pure photography”. For exposure control, the mode dial only offers the classic PASM modes. If you dive into the depths of the menus, however, the Df is quite modern. Nikon gave it the D-Lighting function for shadow illumination, as well as an automatic HDR function that combines two differently exposed shots into one image with perfectly distributed tonal values. It’s also nice that the ISO automatic works with manual exposure – so you can still have the exposure automatically regulated by the ISO sensitivity with a fixed exposure time and aperture value. There is nothing to complain about with the bracketing possibilities, the Df offers a very wide spectrum for exposure series. The options for white balance are also very varied, leaving hardly any wishes unfulfilled. And as you would expect from Nikon, the internal image processing of the Df can be adapted very largely to your own needs or to the requirements of the subject.

What the Df cannot offer, however, is an integrated flash unit. If you don’t want to do without a flash light, you need an additional flash unit. Once this is pushed into the ISO shoe, the almost limitless possibilities of the “Creative Lighting System”, as Nikon calls his (wireless) flash system, open up. In addition: The shutter of the Df allows a quite short flash sync time of 1/250 s – this also distinguishes the camera clearly from its analog counterpart, the F3.

When it comes to video recording, however, the Df must fit. Nikon simply refused her the opportunity to shoot a film – in the sense of “pure photography”. On the other hand, Df does not want to do without the possibility of live view recording. But then photography becomes a bit of a puzzle: First it takes a little while until the camera is set to Live View mode, then you wait until the autofocus has found its target. In practice, Live-View also suffers from the fact that Nikon has fixed the display rigidly to the camera back. It’s quicker to get down to business when serial shots are required: The Df starts recording at 5.8 frames per second (fps) when recording in raw format. With JPEG recordings it is hardly slower with 5.6 fps. If a fast memory card is inserted (at least Class 10), it will sustain the high tempo of JPEG recordings until the maximum of 100 photos per row is reached. With raw photos the Df’s breath runs out faster, here she falls after 22 shots into a comfortable endurance run of 1.4 fps.

Nikon DF Review

Nikon DF Review

Lens

In this country the Nikon Df is offered exclusively as a set with the lens AF-S Nikkor 50 mm F1.8G SE. Its design is adapted to the retro look of the camera, optically and technically it corresponds to the 50/1.8G. In analogue times, zoom lenses with fixed focal lengths were considered significantly inferior, so a 50 millimetre lens was the usual extra input to the camera. Today, Nikon offers high-quality standard zooms that offer more flexibility in image creation. It’s a pity that Nikon doesn’t offer the camera separately, especially as it offers a unique function: The Df is Nikon’s first DSLR that can use almost any F-mount lens manufactured since the bayonet was first introduced in 1959. “Retro” with the Df is therefore not limited to the design and the renunciation of a few functions, the camera actually opens up new (old) possibilities.

The engineers at Nikon had to think hard about this. Before Nikon introduced electronic communication between camera and optics with the first AF lenses in 1986, the current aperture value relative to the speed of the lens was transmitted to the camera’s automatic exposure control via a cam using so-called AI lenses since 1979. The even older non-AI lenses only transmit the current aperture value via a small driver on the bayonet. This so-called “Nikon fork” prevents a non-AI lens from being attached to a modern Nikon at all. With the Df, you can now unfold a small coupling on the bayonet into which the aperture driver of the lens engages. However, no information about the current aperture value of the lens is transmitted to the camera. For correct exposure, the working aperture selected on the lens must therefore be entered again with the front wheel on the Df.

Nikon DF Review

The Nikon Df has no connections or compartments on the handle side, only the cable entry can be seen for the power supply connection. [Photo: Nikon]

This procedure does not apply to AI lenses produced since 1977. However, for non-AI and AI lenses, the Df requires further information about the maximum speed and focal length of the lens, which must first be entered manually – only then can it also provide modern functions such as color matrix measurement or iTTL flash control in conjunction with lenses without a chip. The Df has a total of nine memory locations for non-AI and AI lenses. Naturally, these lenses can only be focused manually. However, the viewfinder of the Df lacks adjustment aids such as a split image indicator or a microprism ring. Only the AF indicator tells you whether you have focused on the subject and if so, which subject. Especially with a large aperture, correct focusing becomes a game of chance. It is easier (but by no means faster) to use the focus loupe, which can be switched on in Live View mode. However, the Df does not offer other wizards, such as focus peaking.

Nikon DF Review

On the other hand, the Nikon Df boasts connections for USB, HDMI, flash system and the universal connection for remote trigger, GPS, etc. [Photo: Nikon]

If the Df is equipped with a current lens, such as the 50 from the set, it will again look quite contemporary. At least almost. Nikon has only given the Df the Multi-Cam 4800FX autofocus module, which also works in the much cheaper D610 and D7100. The fact that you only get 39 focus sensors (as opposed to 51 on the D800) is something you could live with. A bit annoying, however, is that the AF module designed for an APS-C camera in the 35mm DSLR Df only covers a very small area in the image center. After all, the Df focuses quite quickly, the shutter release delay including focusing is about 0.3 seconds. However, this only applies under optimum lighting conditions. If there is little light, as in an evening living room, the AF speed decreases noticeably; in the dim light of a church the autofocus often refused to serve in practice completely. In view of this shortcoming, it is incomprehensible that Nikon has refused the Df an AF auxiliary light. The 16-megapixel sensor would be predestined for available-light photography (more on this in the following section). Nikon only has an image stabilizer if it is integrated into the lens – the Df is no exception. The set lens has to do without it and requires correspondingly higher ISO values when it comes to blur-free exposure times.

Picture quality

Nikon gave the Df the image converter from the top model D4. This sensor in 35mm format is very reserved with a resolution of 16 megapixels, but promises very good noise behaviour thanks to its large pixel spacing. In view of the fact that pre-digital era lenses are less strongly trimmed to the highest possible resolution than current optics, the absence of a few megapixels doesn’t have to be a leg-breaker.

As expected, the Nikon Df with the Nikor AF-S 50 mm 1:1.8 G SE doesn’t exactly turn out to be a resolution miracle. A good 40 line pairs per millimetre (lp/mm) resolve the team – and so do high-quality compact cameras, converted to 35 mm equivalent. It is remarkable, however, that the set lens hardly shows any edge loss in resolution. From aperture F4 on, the image edges and the centrumpraktisch are equally high-resolution, but with an open aperture the edge resolution of 32.8 lp/mm is about 20 percent lower than the resolution in the image centre. The Nikon AF-S 70-200 mm 1:4 G ED VR, which we also tested at the Df, has even more uniform resolution. But also this lens just exceeds the 40 lp/mm mark. The Nikon D800E clearly has more to offer when it comes to the very highest resolution, but on the other hand it also mercilessly exposes every imaging weakness of the lens. The Df is much more good-natured in this respect: the 50 mm set lens shows no chromatic aberrations on its practical side, sharpness artifacts play no role either. This also applies to edge darkening, which in the worst case is somewhat pronounced with open diaphragms.

Nikon DF Review

The Nikon Df’s 35mm sensor comes from the D4 professional camera and has a resolution of 16 megapixels. It reaches a maximum ISO sensitivity of 204,800

When measuring the signal-to-noise ratio, the Df shows its strong side. The curve falls almost linearly to the increase in ISO sensitivity. But it begins with a good 45 dB at such a high level that the critical limit of 35 dB is only reached at ISO 6,400. Correspondingly, the luminance noise barely rises up to ISO 800, then picks up a little more speed, but only climbs strongly beyond the ISO 25.600. The brightness noise becomes disturbing only from ISO 12.800 – such a high sensitivity will rarely be necessary in practice.

Nikon DF ReviewColor noise remains uncritical up to ISO 25.600, so in terms of “noise” the Df easily meets even high demands. This is all the more true as the noise suppression only has to intervene gently: Only beyond ISO 12.800 does the texture sharpness drop below the critical threshold and then rapidly decline further. If one wanted to chalk something up to the noise reduction of the Df, then perhaps that it allows some large grain. However, the grain size only reaches a critical size at ISO 25.600 – so the grain size plays hardly any role in practice. In addition, at ISO values that are relevant in practice, only brightness disturbances become visible; they give the recordings an analog note that fits well with the Df.

The light meter of the Df works reliably like a Swiss clockwork. However, the camera tends to provide ample exposure for low-contrast subjects. From a technical point of view this is quite okay, but subjectively the shots seem brighter than the original scenery. When it comes to high-contrast motifs, the Df delivers solid performance: Between ISO 100 and high ISO 6.400, the input dynamics are between 9.3 and 9.7 f-stops. At the top, one or the other camera may process even higher motif contrasts, but overall the input dynamics of the Df are more than fine. The output dynamics are almost exemplary: up to ISO 400, the Df differentiates the theoretical maximum of 256 tonal value levels of each color and brightness channel. She holds it similarly perfectly with the color fidelity. On average, the deviations from the target values can only just be measured, so they do not play a role in practice. The very high white balance accuracy of the camera certainly contributes to this. By the way, Nikon takes a step in the right direction with the automatic white balance under artificial light. He stifled the yellowish tinge that is usual with almost all cameras and limited himself to a slight warm note.

Except for the somewhat limited resolution, the Df delivers an excellent image quality. Above all, their high-ISO capabilities are outstanding and on a par with even more expensive professional models.

Bottom line

The Df has started to build a bridge between past analogue photography and today’s digital technology. But she is only partially successful in building this bridge. Unique is certainly the possibility to use almost every Nikon lens produced since 1959 on the Df. But the Nikon-style viewfinder makes manual focusing with old optics more difficult compared to the professional models from the 70s and 80s. The Live View mode only slightly alleviates the problem, the possibility of focus peaking is missing, the fixed display unnecessarily restricts the practical suitability of the Live View. When it comes to handling, the retro concept of the Df also proves to be a step backwards. The camera is by far not as comfortable and safe to hold as current Nikon DSLRs, especially the measly handle and the difficult to reach front adjustment wheel are annoying in practice. The dedicated dials also offer no advantages, as they can hardly be operated with one hand when looking through the viewfinder. True to the credo of “pure photography”, the Df completely dispenses with functions for video recording, and does not offer motif and fully automatic functions either. In view of the demands of the camera, this is quite alright. But not that Nikon didn’t provide the Df with a befitting AF module. However, the image quality of the camera compensates for many a shortcoming that you have to live with with the Df. It attaches more importance to excellent high-ISO capabilities than to the highest resolution. Overall, the Df is a camera for lovers almost at the lover’s price. In practice, the D800 is the clearly recommendable alternative – if you don’t want to use lenses from the pre-chip era.

Fact sheet

Fact sheet
Manufacturer Nikon
Model Df
Price approx. 2.930 EUR**
Sensor Resolution 16.6 megapixels
Max. Image resolution 4.928 x 3.280
(aspect ratio) (3:2)
Lens AF-S Nikkor 50mm F1.8G SE
Filter threads 58 mm
Viewfinder Pentaprism
Field of vision 100 %
Enlargement 0,7-fold
Diopter compensation -3 to +1 dpt.
LCD monitor 3,2″
Disbandment 921.000
rotatable
swivelling
as seeker yes
Video output HDMI
as seeker yes
Program automation yes
Aperture priority yes
Aperture priority yes
manual exposure yes
BULB long-term exposure yes
Motif programmes
Portrait
Children/Babies
Countryside
Macro
Sports/Action
more
Exposure metering Multi-field, Centre-weighted Integral, Spot
Flash
Guide number
Flash connection System flash shoe, PC synchronous socket
Remote release Cord
Interval shooting yes
Storage medium SD/SDHC/SDXC
Video mode
Size
Codec
Resolution (max.)
Frame rate (max.)
Sensitivity
automatic ISO 200-204.800 (upper limit adjustable)
manually ISO 50-204.800
White balance
Automatic yes
Sun yes
Clouds yes
Fluorescent lamp yes
Light bulb yes
Other Shadows, flash, metal halide lamps, fine correction
Manual yes
Autofocus
Number of measuring fields 39
AF auxiliary light
Speed approx. 0.3 s
Languages Yes
more 23
Switch-on time approx. 0.3 s
One-hand operation
(zoom and shutter release)
Weight
(Ready)
approx. 765 g (housing only
)approx. 955 g (with lens**)
Continuous shooting function*
Number of series images 100 (JPEG
)22 (RAW)
Frequency
(frames/s)
5.8 (JPEG
)5.6 (RAW)
Endurance run
(frames/s)
– (JPEG
)2.1 (RAW)
with flash
Zoom
Zoom adjustment at lens
Zoom levels continuously variable
Time WW to Tele
Memory speeds*
JPEG 0,7 s (5,8 MByte)
RAW 2,3 s (21,8 MByte)
Triggering during
.Save as possible.
yes
Battery life approx. 1,400 images (according to CIPA)
– = “not applicable” or “not available
“* with Panasonic 4 GByte Class 10 SDHC memory card
** with lens AF-S Nikkor 50mm F1.8G SE

This test of the Nikon Df with Nikon AF-S 50 mm 1:1.8 G SE was created with DXOMARK Analyzer.

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Many possibilities for image processing in the camera
  • Good optical viewfinder (but without manual focus adjustment aids)
  • Excellent image quality (but with weaknesses in resolution)
  • Allows the use of almost all Nikon-F lenses

Cons

  • Only available as a set with lens, high price
  • No video recording possible
  • Weak autofocus, especially in poor light
  • Retro design with untimely limited ergonomics

Nikon Df Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 35mm 36.0 x 24.0 mm (crop factor 1.0
)16.6 megapixels (physical) and 16.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 7.3 µm
Photo resolution
4.928 x 3.280 pixels (3:2)
3.696 x 2.456 pixels (3:2)
2.464 x 1.640 pixels (3:2)
Picture formats JPG, RAW, TIF
Colour depth 42 bits (14 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard

Lens

Lens mount
Nikon F

Focusing

Autofocus mode Phase comparison autofocus with 39 sensors, autofocus working range from -1 EV to 19 EV
Autofocus Functions Single autofocus, Continuous autofocus, Tracking autofocus, Manual, AFL function
Focus control Depth of field control, dimming button

Viewfinder and Monitor

Reflex viewfinder Reflex viewfinder (prism viewfinder) (100 % image coverage), 15 mm interpupillary distance, replaceable focusing screens, grille can be inserted
Monitor 3.2″ TFT LCD monitor with 921,000 pixels, viewing angle 170°, brightness adjustable
Info display additional info display (top)

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement, spot measurement
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 4 s (automatic
)1/4,000 to 30 s (manual)
Exposure control Program automatic, Aperture automatic, Time automatic, Manual
Bracketing function Step size from 1/3 to 3 EV
Exposure compensation -3.0 to +3.0 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 100 to ISO 12.800 (automatic
)ISO 50 to ISO 204.800 (manual)
Remote access Remote tripping
Motives 0 further motif programmes
Picture effects brilliant, landscape, monochrome, portrait, 2 more picture effects
White balance Auto, clouds, sun, shadow, flash, fluorescent lamp with 7 presets, incandescent light, from 2.500 to 10.000 K
Continuous shooting 5.5 frames/s at highest resolution
Self-timer Self-timer at intervals of 2 s, special features: or 10 s (optional)
Shooting functions AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Flash no built-in flash availableFlash shoe
: Nikon, standard centre contactFlash connection socket
: F-plug
Flash range Flash sync time 1/200 s
Flash functions Auto, Fill-in flash, Slow sync, Flash on second shutter curtain, Red-eye reduction

Equipment

Image stabilizer no optical image stabilizer
Memory
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
Internal memory yes
GPS function GPS external (wired or plug-on receiver)
Power supply Power supply connection
Power supply 1 x Nikon EN-EL14a (lithium ions (Li-Ion), 7.3 V, 1,230 mAh)
Playback Functions Picture index, slide show function
Picture parameters Sharpness, contrast, color saturation
Special functions Grid can be faded in, orientation sensor, Live View
Ports Data interfaces: USBUSB type
:USB 2.0 High Speed
AV connectors AV output: HDMI output Mini (Type C
) Audio input: noAudio output
: no
Supported direct printing methods DPOF, PictBridge
Tripod socket 1/4″
Features and Miscellaneous Sensor cleaningReference image
with dust detection function (only with Capture NX2)
Additional 3:2 image resolutions (DX format) of 3,200 × 2,1282
,400 × 1,592 and 1,600 ×1.064 pixelflash bracket
with 2-5 frames with 1/3, 2/3, 1, 2 or 3 EVADL bracket
with 2, 3 or 5 shotsActive
D-Lighting (ADL) with five step-dynamic
AF metering fields (9, 21 or 39 metering points)
Light display

Size and weight

Dimensions W x H x D 144 x 110 x 66 mm
Weight 765 g (ready for operation)

Other

included accessories Nikon BF-1B (Case Cover
)Nikon BS-1 (Hot Shoe Cover)
Nikon DK-26 (Eyepiece Cover)
Nikon
EN-EL14 Special Batter
yNikon
EN-EL14a Special BatteryNikon
MH-24 Charger for Special BatteriesChargerUSB-Connection CableUSB-CableUC-E6TragegurtTragegurtAN-DC9Imaging Software
ViewNX 2 for Windows and Macintosh

 

Nikon DF Review
Manufacturer Nikon
Model AF-S 50 mm 1.8 G SE
Price (UVP) 329,00 EUR
Bayonet connection Nikon F
Focal length 50,0 mm
Luminous intensity (largest aperture) F1,8
Smallest aperture opening F16
KB full format yes
Lens system 7 lenses in 6 group incl.
ED and aspherical lenses
Number of orifice plates 7
Closest focusing distance 450 mm
Image stabilizer available no
Autofocus available yes
Water/dust protection no
Filter threads 58 mm
Dimensions (diameter x length) 72 x 52 mm
Lens weight 185 g

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