CAMARAS Sony RX1 RX1R Review

Sony RX1 RX1R Review

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Sony RX1 RX1R Review

Home CAMARAS Sony RX1 RX1R Review

Sony DSC-RX1 and DSC-RX1R Review

Sony introduces DSC-RX1 compact camera with full-frame sensor

The RX1R full-format camera differs from the RX1 introduced before, in that it does not have a resolution-reducing low-pass filter.

The RX1R full-format camera differs from the RX1 introduced before, in that it does not have a resolution-reducing low-pass filter.

It already takes some courage to equip a digital camera with a fixed focal length and a 35mm full-format sensor and then charge more than 3,000 euros for it. But this is exactly what Sony dares to do with the DSC-RX1 and thus gains access to the exclusive circle of premium manufacturers. There’s no doubt that the RX1 is exemplary and unrivalled – so we were all the more excited about this consistently purist camera, whose image quality should be second to none. Whether the RX1 can meet the high expectations, we have thoroughly tested practially and with the help of the testing software. As a lookup, we also measured the RX1R, which does not need a low-pass filter, in the test software.

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Very good operation including three user memories
  • Excellent workmanship
  • Excellent image quality, especially up to ISO 800
  • Despite the puristic basic concept, a wide range of equipment with numerous modern special functions

Cons

  • Visible distortion as the only picture quality shortcoming
  • Relatively slow autofocus
  • Short battery life
  • Sweep panorama with a maximum resolution of only twelve megapixels

With the Cyber-shot DSC-RX1, Sony has set itself a lot of goals. The fueled expectations of image quality are correspondingly high. Thanks to a full-format sensor with 24.3 megapixels, a BIONZ image processor and a powerful Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* lens with 35 mm fixed focal length and a maximum aperture of F2, the basic requirements are better than with many a SLR camera with an APS-C sensor. In addition, the RX1’s extremely compact dimensions, flyweight of 482 grams and light sensitivity of up to ISO 102,400 in multi-frame noise reduction make it the ideal choice for a wide range of applications.

Below are the two models RX1 and RX1R.

Sony RX1 RX1R Review

Sony RX1 RX1R Review

Sony’s ultimate weapon for superior image quality is the new Exmor CMOS full-frame sensor designed specifically for the SLT flagship SLT-A99. Its high transistor density (Large Scale Integration) increases signal processing by the image processor and the range of light sensitivity. In addition, there is a new optical multi-segment low-pass filter. In combination with the BIONZ image processor, the RX1 can produce up to five frames per second. Recordings can be saved in uncompressed 14-bit RAW format. The Sonnar T* lens from Carl Zeiss rounds off the basic equipment for optimum image quality. The newly developed optical system consists of eight elements in seven groups, including three aspherical lenses including an AA lens element. The circular aperture with seven slats and the maximum aperture of F2 should produce a bokeh as beautiful as an SLR camera. The focusing range starts at 24 cm measured from the front of the lens. In macro mode, it shortens to 14 to 29 cm. If you want to zoom despite the fixed focal length, you can rely on the advantages of the full-format sensor: with Pixel Super Resolution Technology and clear image zoom function, the focal length can be doubled, according to Sony, without having to accept strong quality losses as with the classic digital zoom.

Sony RX1 RX1R ReviewAccording to Sony, the XXL sensor, which is almost 30 times larger than the sensors commonly used in compact cameras, is extremely light-sensitive and offers absolute detail thanks to its high resolution – without any significant image noise. The Exmor CMOS sensor has a sensitivity range from ISO 100 to ISO 25,600, which sounds too good to be true, but the RX1 can do even more. ISO 50 can be set in Expanded mode and ISO 102.400 can be set in Multi-Shot Noise Reduction. That sounds intoxicating. How much (or little) noise the RX1 actually produces will be shown in the laboratory tests. The advantages of the sensor also come to bear in the video function. The RX1 films in full HD resolution and in 50p/60p and 25p/24p standards. Everything can be controlled in the film mode by means of aperture, time and program automatic as well as manual control. Sony also promises high image quality and minimized noise, especially in low light conditions.

Sony RX1 RX1R ReviewIn order to take full advantage of all the DSC-RX1’s possibilities, a variety of manual setting options are available. An adjustment ring on the lens controls the aperture and focus, and the focus is set using a control knob located on the front of the camera. The same buttons are available for exposure and shooting mode. The Quick-Navi mode allows you to recall and change all relevant camera settings. The optionally available electronic viewfinder FDA-EV1MK, which displays the settings made, helps here. The MF Assist and Pro-Style Peaking functions also only really come into their own with the viewfinder, as all picture elements that are exactly on the focus level are highlighted in colour. Of course, this can also be read on the three inch measuring display. The RX1 is also equipped with double anti-shake protection (optical SteadyShot and ISO with active mode), 13 automatic creative functions and various post-processing effects. In addition, the Auto HDR function, the contrast amplifier D-Range Optimization (DRO) and a continuous shooting with different exposure levels, different white balances and various DRO settings.

You can’t see the power of the DSC-RX1’s inner life from the outside. With its dimensions of 113.3 x 65.4 x 69.9 mm and a weight of 482 grams including battery and memory card, it can compete with almost any classic compact camera. The understatement of the exterior is strongly reminiscent of Leica’s camera philosophy. Also the price can keep up, because for the RX1 one leaves a proud 3,100 euros on the counter. In addition to the already mentioned electronic viewfinder FDA-EV1MK, accessories include an optical viewfinder FDA-V1K, a flash unit, a clip-on LCD monitor and a matching leather case LCJ-RXB. The extensions can be attached to the camera via the multi-interface shoe (accessory shoe).

Ergonomics and workmanship

For a 35mm full-frame camera, the Sony DSC-RX1 has an amazingly compact body with a depth of less than three centimetres. However, the striking lens protrudes a good four centimeters forward. At just under 500 grams, the RX1 is not necessarily one of the lightweights, but the workmanship is absolutely high-quality and impeccable. The RX1 looks like it has been milled from a single block. All inscriptions on the numerous control elements are not just printed or glued on, but milled into the material and filled with white paint, which should speak for absolute longevity. All control wheels lock into place, especially the program selector wheel is very tight, so that an accidental adjustment should be impossible. Only the exposure correction wheel could be adjusted unintentionally when handling the camera more roughly. On the right side of the housing a grained rubber provides the necessary hold for the camera.

The RX1 can be operated almost entirely with the right hand, only the focus mode wheel at the front of the lens and the flash release are in the left hand’s hands – and of course the lens settings (see corresponding section below). Even though at first glance the RX1 seems to get by with just a few keys, it can be operated without much fuss. The possibility of far-reaching individualisation, which is not so obvious at first glance, contributes above all to this. Not only does the program selector wheel offer three directly recallable memory locations for frequently used camera settings, but five buttons can also be programmed. These are the C button on the top, three of the four buttons on the four-weigher and the AEL button, which can be individually adjusted. There are also two rotating wheels on the back of the camera.

The RX1 is switched on via the practical switch on the shutter release. The release itself offers two distinct pressure points and a screw thread for connecting a mechanical remote release. On the left side of the housing, a robust plastic flap covers three interfaces. Not only can the memory card be read out via the Micro-USB connection, but the replaceable lithium-ion battery can also be charged via it. Although this can be done with any mobile phone charger, which saves the need for a separate charger when travelling, the battery is only sufficient for 220 shots according to the CIPA standard measurement procedure. Together with the spare battery, one should also consider the purchase of an external charging cradle, but at a price of over 3,000 euros, it is also likely to be included in the scope of delivery of the camera. Sony also uses a standard connection with Micro-HDMI for the HDMI interface. If you have a CEC-capable television, you can even control the picture reproduction of the camera with your TV remote control. The third interface is a stereo jack socket in standard 3.5 mm format. As an alternative to a stereo microphone, a power supply unit can also be connected here if the RX1 is used in a photo studio, for example. Apropos studio use: The metal tripod thread is exemplarily located in the optical axis. However, the distance to the memory card and battery compartment is not sufficient to open it on the tripod. As already mentioned, the lithium-ion NP-BX1 battery is quite small with only 4.5 Wh, while the memory card slot accepts the very large SDXC cards without any complaints, in addition to the SD form factor, Sony’s own MemoryStick is also supported.

The absence of a viewfinder may not fit the puristic concept at all. However, with the RX1, Sony doesn’t rely on the retro trend like some other manufacturers, but on modernity. If you absolutely want a viewfinder, you can connect it via the ISO flash shoe. In addition to a purely optical viewfinder, Sony also offers a high-resolution electronic viewfinder as an accessory, which can be conveniently folded upwards as an angle finder. However, this has an impact of around 450 euros. With 2.36 million pixels, it offers an extremely high resolution of 1,024 x 768 pixels (XGA) and covers 100 percent of the image field. The 1.09x magnification is equivalent to a giant viewfinder image.

Sony RX1 RX1R Review

However, the latent high-frequency flicker that at least sensitive natures perceive disturbs the OLED. Two eyecups are included in the scope of delivery of the viewfinder, even a noble transport box is included. The viewfinder is controlled via a multipole interface located in the front of the flash shoe. The viewfinder snaps into place slightly when attached, but does not provide any protection against accidental loosening, so you should take good care of it. The large viewfinder image is difficult to see with glasses, but the viewfinder offers a diopter correction from -4 to +1 dpt.

The 7.5 centimeter screen on the back of the camera looks dominant. Its high resolution of 1.23 million pixels is composed of four subpixels per true color pixel due to the RGBW structure, resulting in an effective resolution of 640 x 480 pixels (VGA). Each pixel thus consists of a red, green, blue and white pixel, of which Sony expects above all a higher brightness of the monitor and thus a better readability in bright ambient light. The monitor brightness is adjusted automatically by the camera based on the ambient light, but can also be adjusted manually. The bright monitor image helps with readability in bright environments, and the effective anti-reflection coating also plays its part. The screen offers numerous superimpositions such as camera settings, three different grids, a live histogram and an electronic spirit level, which displays not only the horizontal but also the vertical inclination. Both the live histogram and the brightness of the live image adjust with manual exposure and exposure correction, so you get a good preview of the later photo. If the flash is switched on when the exposure is too dark, the monitor image brightens again. Important camera settings that cannot be accessed using the programmed one-touch keys can be accessed via the Fn quick menu. The camera settings displayed on the left and right of the screen can then be selected and adjusted directly. The menu itself is divided into numerous well structured tabs, vertical scrolling is no longer necessary, which greatly enhances the clarity.

Equipment

Even though the Sony DSC-RX1 is more aimed at enthusiastic hobby and professional photographers due to its high price, it offers numerous automatic functions, so that the control of the photo parameters is not necessary in order to get technically orderly photos. In addition to numerous scene modes, the RX1 also offers a fully automatic mode with scene recognition. Whether macro, portrait, landscape or backlight situation: the camera recognizes this and adjusts itself optimally to it. However, the best way to operate the Sony is in the automatic timer and manually. In the manual mode, even the ISO automatic continues to work if desired, so that you still get an automatically correctly exposed photo with a given aperture and exposure time. The automatic system can be configured in the range from ISO 100 to 25,600; in other words, the user decides where it begins and ends. With manual ISO setting, even third levels can be selected and the range can be extended downwards up to ISO 50. The Multi-Frame-NR function increases sensitivity up to ISO 102,400, allowing the camera to take six shots in quick succession and process them into an image with lower noise.

The automatic system does not work consistently in one respect: The flash unit must be unlocked manually by the user. With a guide number of measured 5.8, it is rather one of the weaker ones, but together with the high luminous intensity and the large ISO range, an amazing range can be achieved, for example 11.5 meters at aperture F2 and ISO 1,600 or even 23 meters at ISO 6,400. The flash shines well into the corners, which are about 40 to 50 percent light loss due to the gentle decrease in brightness not so unpleasant. Once opened, the flash offers an automatic function in the automatic mode as well as in the scene modes, i.e. it only fires when required. In the creative programs P, A, S and M, on the other hand, the flash always fires when opened. But the photographer also has long-term synchronisation, flash at the end of the exposure, wireless flash control and flash exposure correction at his disposal. The TTL system flash shoe allows larger flash units to be connected, with Sony using the new ISO flash shoe in the RX1, which replaces the old Minolta shoe and also allows the use of simple centre contact flashes. An adapter is available as an accessory for the old system flash units, and Sony also offers a studio flash cable adapter for the flash shoe.

The RX1 takes serial pictures at a fast rate of just over five frames per second, as long as the focus and exposure are not tracked, otherwise the serial frame rate drops depending on the situation. Twelve shots in raw (with 14 bit colour depth per channel) or 13 shots in JPEG Superfine can be taken at a time before the continuous shooting rate drops significantly to around one image every two seconds despite the fast memory card. Raw and JPEG can also be recorded simultaneously. The RX1 always stores photos in the background, so as long as there is still room in the buffer, you can continue taking pictures without interruption. If you open the memory card compartment while saving, a red LED will warn you not to remove the card until all photos have been written.

The RX1 records videos in maximum Full HD resolution (1,920 x 1,080 pixels) at 25p, 50i or 50p in AVCHD format. Videos can also be saved in MP4 format, but the resolution then drops to 1,440 x 1,080 pixels, and VGA resolution is also available. Unfortunately, the RX1 doesn’t offer the small HD resolution of 1,280 x 720 pixels. The sound is recorded either via the internal stereo microphone or via an externally connected wind filter with automatic output and optional switchable wind filter. The camera tracks the focus inaudibly, gently and reasonably quickly, without tending to pump too much. Aperture, shutter speed and ISO sensitivity can be set manually. A video recording button allows movie recording at any time, in addition, the RX1 offers a dedicated movie mode on the program selector wheel.

Sony doesn’t skimp on the RX1’s modern features such as a hand-held night scene mode that combines multiple photos into one or panoramic views. However, the panorama functions only provide a resolution of twelve megapixels, so higher resolution panoramas still have to be made with a panorama head from a tripod and put together on the computer. In addition, the Sony offers adjustable image parameters, sRGB and AdobeRGB as selectable color space and even digital filters and effects, such as retro camera, pop color, black and white, blur etc.. Face and smile recognition are on board, as are automatic portrait trimming and a soft skin function that automatically eliminates skin blemishes. The camera, on the other hand, is short on post-processing options in image reproduction and does not have a raw development function either. The DRO function, on the other hand, already takes effect during the recording, it is supposed to optimize the tonal value curve in order to work out the drawing better in lights and shadows. The HDR mode automatically takes three differently exposed photos and merges them into a single image that provides continuous highlights and shadows even in high-contrast situations. Optionally, the camera automatically determines the exposure distance or the photographer sets it between one and up to six EV.

Lens

The opulent Carl Zeiss Sonnar lens of the Sony RX1 offers space for three adjustment rings. The front one is the electronic focus ring, just behind it is the macro adjustment ring. The close-up limit in normal focus mode is 35 centimeters from the sensor plane marked at the top of the camera body. This corresponds to about 29 centimeters from the front edge of the lens. Internal focusing ensures that the front lens does not rotate with the 49 mm filter thread, nor does it retract or extend. Sony even thought of a bayonet for a sun visor, but the visor itself has to be purchased as a separate accessory. If the macro ring is set to macro mode, the lens barrel extends by about two millimeters and the close-up limit drops to 20 centimeters from the sensor level or 14 centimeters from the front lens. The maximum focus distance in macro mode is only 35 centimeters, so macro mode is really only suitable for very close subjects. The maximum reproduction scale is then about 1:3.9, so that scene modes about 14 centimetres wide can be reproduced in full format.

Sony RX1 RX1R Review

The Sony DSC-RX1 doesn’t exactly stain itself with fame at the autofocus speed. It takes about 0.8 seconds to focus from infinity to about two meters. The pure release delay after focusing is a fast 0.03 seconds. In dark environments, a switchable orange AF auxiliary light illuminates the subject. In single-focus mode, the autofocus motor is audible, but the soft refocusing during filming is inaudible. The focus mode switch at the front of the lens on the camera body provides three settings: Autofocus (AF), Direct Manual Focus (DMF) and Manual Focus (MF). The DMF mode allows direct manual correction after automatic focusing. The RX1 has both a continuous autofocus, which is activated by the central confirmation button on the navigation cross, and a tracking autofocus, which can track a target subject across the field of view. Focusing is done with nine measuring fields, which are automatically selected by the camera. It is also possible to use either only the middle autofocus area or a flexible spot autofocus that can be finely graduated over almost the entire image area. Only the outermost edges are left out. The ring for manual focusing is extremely fine and precise to operate. In addition to a distance indicator, the RX1 also offers a focus loupe function and focus peaking. The latter highlights contrasting edges in color, so you can see exactly where the image was focused.

Sony RX1 RX1R Review

The lens has a classic reportage focal length of 35 millimetres, which is less suitable for face portraits, for example, unless you’re into big noses. Only up to four times the digital zoom is available, but the effectively used sensor image resolution drops at maximum magnification to 1.5 megapixels at 140 millimeters corresponding to 35mm. If only the so-called clear image zoom is used, only a maximum magnification of two times is available. But from the remaining six megapixels of resolution, Sony wants to calculate a photo that looks like 24 megapixels visually by means of interpolation that recognizes edges, draws sharply and treats structured surfaces with textures. The RX1’s central shutter operates with a virtually inaudible click, so you can photograph silently even at theatrical performances or in churches and museums. The RX1 does not have an optical or mechanical image stabilizer, but in movie mode the image is effectively stabilized electronically.

The third and rearmost adjustment ring on the lens allows direct adjustment of the aperture in third steps between F2 and F22, whereby each step snaps in noticeably without the ring being difficult to adjust. In the automatic mode the aperture ring has no function. The nine rounded front slats ensure a pleasantly soft bokeh. Lens aberrations such as vignetting, color fringing, and distortion can be corrected automatically, with distortion correction turned off by default while the other two are on. This is because distortion correction has the most negative effect on the image quality, and in addition to a slight change in the image section, it also results in a higher level of edge blur. You should therefore only use this correction if the distortion is particularly annoying for a subject.

Picture quality

In practice, the Sony RX1 is a convincing choice with vivid, low-noise photos that show many details and an extremely creamy bokeh, even with highlights in the blurred background. Of course, we also wanted to know how she was doing in the test laboratory. The laboratory test was done in default settings, which means an activated correction of color fringes and edge darkening, but a deactivated distortion correction. The standard image style was chosen, DRO however we switched off and set the image quality to JPEG Superfine. Even with the aperture open, the lens shows an extremely high resolution of just under 46 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) in the center of the image; towards the edge of the image it loses less than 10 percent of its resolution. Even for a fixed focal length this is an excellent value, especially considering the focal length.

Sony RX1 RX1R ReviewDimming is hardly able to increase the resolution, it reaches a maximum of almost 50 lp/mm, but drops minimally again from F5.6. With F11, the open aperture resolution is slightly undershot due to diffraction; only with the smallest aperture F22 does the resolution fall just under the value of 40 lp/mm. When dimming down, the image edge hardly increases in resolution, so that the edge drop is then over ten percent, but still significantly below 20 percent. By the way, Sony achieves the high resolution without disturbingly strong sharpness artifacts, the artifact rate always remains below ten percent. Neither edge darkening nor colour fringes play a major role, but the distortion does. It is about two percent tonne in shape, not exactly a little bit for a 35 millimetre lens.

Up to and including ISO 800, the signal-to-noise ratio is at a high level of 40 to 45 dB; only at ISO 12.800 is the critical value of 35 dB undershot. Color noise plays practically no role, although the measurement curve still shows a stronger color noise reduction from ISO 800. The brightness noise is also very low and only begins to become easily visible at the highest ISO level of 25,600. The noise with a grain size of less than two pixels always remains very fine-grained. Textures are reproduced extremely sharply by the RX1 to ISO 800, but there’s nothing to criticize about texture reproduction.

Sony RX1 RX1R Review

 

Even at the highest sensitivity of ISO 25.600, the textures are still sufficiently sharp. From ISO 100 to 1,600, the input dynamics are at a very high level of almost eleven f-stops. ISO 50, on the other hand, attenuates the signal, which explains why the input dynamics are lower by more than one f-stop. Up to and including ISO 6.400, the input dynamics remain at a good level of over ten f-stops. The tonal curve is quite steep, which confirms the visual impression of the contrast-rich crisp images. These are not necessarily the best prerequisites for image post-processing, demanding image editors should prefer the raw format, especially since with 14 bits per color channel much finer gradations are available here than with the 8 bits of the JPEG format. The output tonal range is very good up to ISO 800 with over 225 of 256 levels, up to ISO 6,400 it remains at a good level of over 160 levels. The actual color depth is also very good, up to ISO 12,800 the RX1 can reproduce over two million color gradations, up to ISO 400 even over eight million. While the manual white balance is very precise, this is not necessarily true for color reproduction. The Sony RX1 has a very high colour saturation, especially in colors such as purple, red, orange and yellow.

Sony RX1 RX1R ReviewHalf a year after our test of the RX1, Sony launched the RX1R in August 2013. The only difference between the RX1 and the RX1 is that the RX1R doesn’t have a low-pass filter. However, these did not occur in our practical test of the RX1R. As expected, the laboratory test of the RX1R shows no significant differences to the RX1 with the exception of the resolution. Only the sharpness artifacts are still slightly affected, pleasantly the RX1R shows slightly less artifacts than the RX1. In terms of resolution, the RX1R is about ten percent higher than the RX1, a dimension we already noticed with the Nikopn D800/D800E and Pentax K-5II/K-5 IIs, also camera-willing, which differ by the low-pass filter. The highest resolution in the N image center is achieved at F2.8 and F4 with 56 lp/mm each, the image edge has the highest resolution at F8 with almost 46 lp/mm, at this aperture you also get the best overall performance, in the center of the image the resolution is 51 lp/mm. Interestingly, the RX1R has a slightly lower resolution than the RX1, especially with more open apertures at the edge of the picture. One factor could be the lower resharpening, but measuring tolerances and last but not least a slight series scatter can also have an effect. The up to three line pairs per millimetre difference are hardly worth mentioning, especially as the RX1R, when dimmed at the edge of the picture, again has a resolution just under 4 lp/mm higher than the RX1.

Bottom line

Like the RX1R, the Sony DSC-RX1 knows how to impress above all with its phenomenally good picture quality and rock-solid workmanship at the highest level. The lens is sharp to the edge of the image and the sensor offers low-noise, dynamic photos over a wide ISO range. In JPEG, the camera is very crisply tuned, especially with contrasts and colors, so that the photos do not need any further processing. On the other hand, those who want to edit images should prefer the raw format with its 14 bit colour depth per channel. Although the concept of the camera and lens is consistently puristic, which is rewarded above all with the very good image quality, Sony is not stingy with modern features that make everyday photography easier. The reliable automatic function is just as important as the panorama function or the HDR recording mode, the RX1 even offers digital filters. Only the image post-processing in the camera is not its strength. Thanks to numerous configurable buttons and three user programs, the operation of the Sony can be very well adapted to your own needs. At best, one can criticize the poor battery life and the somewhat sluggish autofocus as well as the strong distortion in the image quality, which can already be corrected digitally in the camera via the menu option. Taking pictures with the Sony DSC-RX1 is a lot of fun; it’s a shame that the outstanding quality also has its justified price of over 3,000 euros.

Fact sheet

Fact sheet
Manufacturer Sony
Model DSC-RX1
Price approx. 3.100 EUR
Sensor Resolution 24.3 megapixels
Max. Image resolution 6.000 x 4.000
(aspect ratio) (3:2)
Lens Carl zeiss Sonnar T* 35 mm 2.0
Filter threads 49 mm
Viewfinder optional electronic
Field of vision 100 %
Enlargement 1,09-fold
Disbandment 2.36 million
Diopter compensation -4 to +1 dpt.
LCD monitor 3″
Disbandment 1.23 million
rotatable
swivelling
as viewfinder yes
Video output HDMI
as viewfinder yes
Program automation yes
Aperture priority yes
Aperture priority yes
manual exposure yes
BULB long-term exposure yes
Scene modes
Portrait yes
Children/Babies
Countryside yes
Macro
Sports/Action yes
more 4 other scene modes
Exposure metering Multi-field, Centre-weighted Integral, Spot
Flash yes
Guide number 5.8 (measurement)
Flash connection Standard system flash shoe
Remote release Wire
Interval shooting
Storage medium SD/SDHC/SDXC, MemoryStick
Video mode
Size AVCHD or MP4
Codec H.264/AVC
Resolution (max.) 1.920 x 1.080
Frame rate (max.) 50p
Sensitivity
automatic ISO 100-25.600 (upper and lower limit adjustable)
manually ISO 50-25.600
White balance
Automatic yes
Sun yes
Clouds yes
Fluorescent lamp yes
Light bulb yes
Other Shadows, flash, manual color temperature selection, fine correction
Manual yes
Autofocus
Number of measuring fields 9
AF auxiliary light orange
Speed approx. 0.83 s
Languages Yes
more 16 languages in total
Switch-on time 1,9 s
One-hand operation
(zoom and shutter release)
Weight
(Ready)
approx. 478 g
Continuous shooting function*
Number of series images 13 (JPEG
)12 (RAW)
Frequency
(frames/s)
5.2 (JPEG
)5.3 (RAW)
Endurance run
(frames/s)
0.5 (JPEG
)0.6 (RAW)
with flash yes
Zoom
Zoom adjustment
Zoom levels
Time WW to Tele
Memory speeds*
JPEG 2,4 s (9,9 MByte)
RAW 3.3 s (23.9 MByte)
Triggering during
.Save as possible.
yes
Battery life approx. 220 pictures (according to CIPA)
– = “not applicable” or “not available
“* with Sony 16 GByte 94 MB/s Class 10 SDHC memory card

 

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Very good operation including three user memories
  • Excellent workmanship
  • Excellent image quality, especially up to ISO 800
  • Despite the puristic basic concept, a wide range of equipment with numerous modern special functions

Cons

  • Visible distortion as the only picture quality shortcoming
  • Relatively slow autofocus
  • Short battery life
  • Sweep panorama with a maximum resolution of only twelve megapixels

 

Sony DSC-RX1 Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 35mm 36.0 x 24.0 mm (crop factor 1.0
)24.7 megapixels (physical), 24.3 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 6,0 µm
Photo resolution
4.240 x 2.832 pixels (3:2)
3.936 x 2.624 pixels (3:2)
2.640 x 1.488 pixels (16:9)
Picture formats JPG, RAW
Color depth 24 bits (8 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard
Video resolution
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 p
1.440 x 1.080 (4:3) 30 p
640 x 480 (4:3) 30 p
Video format
MPG4 (Codec H.264)

Lens

Focal length 35 mm (35mm-equivalent
)Digital zoom 2x
Apertures F2 (wide angle)
Autofocus yes
Autofocus Functions Single autofocus, Continuous autofocus, Tracking autofocus, Manual, AF Assist Light
Filter threads 49 mm

Viewfinder and Monitor

Monitor 3.0″ TFT LCD monitor with 1,229,000 pixels, touchscreen

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement, spot measurement
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 30 s (automatic
)1/4,000 to 30 s (manual)Bulb function
Exposure control Program automatic, Aperture automatic, Time automatic, Manual
Bracketing function Bracket function with maximum 3 shots, step size from 0.3 to 0.7 EV, HDR function
Exposure compensation -2.0 to +2.0 EV with step size of 1/3 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 100 to ISO 25.600 (automatic
)ISO 50 to ISO 25.600 (manual)
Remote access Cable release
Scene modes Twilight, various scene modes, fireworks, high sensitivity, landscape, food, macro, night scene, portrait, sunset, sports/action, animals, 0 other scene modes
Picture effects Bright, Autumn Leaves, Clear, Landscape, Lively, Night Scene, Neutral, Portrait, Black & White, Sepia (contrast, saturation, sharpness adjustable in ±3 levels), Sunset, Deep
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sun, Fine tuning, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 1 presets, Incandescent lamp, from 2,500 to 9,900 K, Manual
Color space Adobe RGB, sRGB
Continuous shooting 5 frames/s at highest resolution
Self-timer Self-timer at intervals of 2 s, special features: or 10 s (optional)
Shooting functions Live histogram

Flashgun

Flash built-in flash (hinged)
Flash range 0.8 to 21.7 m with wide-angle flash range
with ISO auto guide number
6 (ISO 100)
Flash number
Guide number 6 (ISO 100)
Flash functions Auto, Fill Flash, Flash On, Flash Off, Slow Sync, Red-eye Reduction

Equipment

Image stabilizer no optical image stabilizer
Memory
Memory Stick (Duo Pro)
SD
Microphone Stereo
Power supply 1 x Sony NP-BX1 (lithium ion (Li-Ion), 3.6 V, 1,240 mAh
)220 images according to CIPA standard
Playback Functions Red eye retouching, image rotation, image index, slide show function with music
Face recognition Face recognition, smile recognition
Picture parameters Contrast
Special functions Electronic spirit level
Ports Data interfaces: USB USB Type
: USB 2.0 High SpeedAudio Input
: yes (3.5 mm stereo jack with power supply)
Video Output: yes (HDMI Micro Output (Type D))
Supported direct printing methods PictBridge
Tripod socket 1/4″
Features and Miscellaneous (HD-)SmartZoom digital zoom (magnification factor depends on resolution setting
)ISO extension (with Multiframe NR) up to ISO 102.400 Optical
Image StabilizerAdditional
aspect ratios of 4:3 and 1:1Multiframe noise reduction
at ISO 12.800 and 25,600 built-in
lens curtainBIONZ signal processorShake warning indicatorPlayback zoomBuilt-in

stereo microphoneEdge enhancement
can be switched on with manual focusDynamic range optimizationAuto portrait framingPicture effects

:

Tone separation/posterisation (colourS/W
)
Pop colourRetro photoPart colour

(redYellowBlueGreen

)
Monochrome rich in contrastToy cameraSoft

High-KeySoft drawingHDR paintingDesaturated

monochromeMiniature shutter speed

at aperture settings of 2, 2.8 and 4 maximum 1/2000 second

Size and weight

Weight 482 g (operational)
Dimensions W x H x D 113 x 65 x 70 mm

Other

included accessories Sony AC-UD10 AC AdapterSony
NP-BX1 Special Battery PackUSB Connection CableHarnessCamera SoftwarePicture Motion Browser for Windows (2000/Me/XP)
Camera Software Picture Package Music TransferSPVD-010
USB Device Driver for Windows and Macintosh
optional accessory Sony NP-BX1 Special battery packPower supplyUnchangeable memory cardCamera case
USB
USB 2.0 High Speed

Sony DSC-RX1R Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 35mm 36.0 x 24.0 mm (crop factor 1.0
)24.7 megapixels (physical), 24.3 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 6,0 µm
Photo resolution
6.000 x 3.376 pixels (16:9)
4.240 x 2.832 pixels (3:2)
3.936 x 2.624 pixels (3:2)
3.936 x 2.216 pixels (16:9)
2.640 x 1.760 pixels (3:2)
2.640 x 1.488 pixels (16:9)
Picture formats JPG, RAW
Color depth 24 bits (8 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard
Video resolution
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 60 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 60 i
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 i
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 25 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 24 p
1.440 x 1.080 (4:3) 30 p
1.440 x 1.080 (4:3) 25 p
640 x 480 (4:3) 30 p
640 x 480 (4:3) 25 p
Video format
MPG4 (Codec H.264)
AVCHD (Codec H.264)

Lens

Focal length 35 mm (35mm-equivalent
)Digital zoom 2x
Focus range 24 cm to infinity (wide angle)
Apertures F2 to F22 (wide angle)
Autofocus yes
Autofocus mode Contrast autofocus with 25 measuring fields
Autofocus Functions Single Auto Focus, Continuous Auto Focus, Tracking Auto Focus, Manual, AFL Function, AF Assist Light, Focus Peaking, Focus Magnifier
Filter threads 49 mm

Viewfinder and Monitor

Monitor 3.0″ TFT LCD monitor with 1,229,000 pixels, antireflective coating

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement, spot measurement
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 30 s (automatic
)1/4,000 to 30 s (manual)Bulb function
Exposure control Fully automatic, Program automatic, Aperture automatic, Time automatic, Manual
Bracketing function Bracket function with maximum 3 shots, step size from 0.3 to 0.7 EV, HDR function
Exposure compensation -3.0 to +3.0 EV with step size of 1/3 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 100 to ISO 25.600 (automatic
)ISO 50 to ISO 25.600 (manual)
Remote access Cable release
Scene modes Twilight, fireworks, high sensitivity, landscape, food, macro, night scene, portrait, sunset, sports/action, animals, 0 other scene modes
Picture effects HDR effect, high key, miniature effect, monochrome, retro, toy camera, soft focus, light, autumn leaves, clear, landscape, vibrant, night scene, neutral, portrait, black/white, sepia (contrast, saturation, sharpness adjustable in ±3 steps), sunset, low, 6 other image effects
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sun, White balance bracketing, Fine tuning, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 1 presets, Incandescent light, from 2,500 to 9,900 K, Manual
Color space Adobe RGB, sRGB
Continuous shooting 5 frames/s at highest resolution
Self-timer Self-timer at intervals of 2 s, special features: or 10 s (optional)
Shooting functions AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Flash built-in flash (hinged
)flash shoe: Sony Multi Interface, standard center contact
Flash range 0.8 to 21.7 m with wide-angle flash range
with ISO auto guide number
6 (ISO 100)
Flash number
Guide number 6 (ISO 100)
Flash functions Auto, Fill Flash, Flash On, Flash Off, Slow Sync, Red-eye Reduction

Equipment

Image stabilizer no optical image stabilizer
Memory
Memory Stick (Duo, Duo Pro)
SD (SDHC, SDXC)
Panorama Swivel panorama
3.872 x 2.160 pixels
8.192 x 1.856 pixels
5.536 x 2.160 pixels
12.416 x 1.856 pixels
Microphone Stereo
Power supply Power supply unit connectionUSB continuous power supplyUSB charging function
Power supply 1 x Sony NP-BX1 (lithium ion (Li-Ion), 3.6 V, 1,240 mAh
)220 images according to CIPA standard
Playback Functions Red eye retouching, video editing, image cropping, image rotation, image protection, highlight / shadow warning, playback histogram, playback magnifier, image index, slide show function with music, zoom out
Face recognition Face recognition, smile recognition
Picture parameters Sharpness, contrast, color saturation
Grid can be faded in during recording yes
Special functions Electronic spirit level, orientation sensor, Live View, user profiles with 3 user profiles
Ports Data interfaces: USB USB Type
: USB 2.0 High Speed Audio Output
: noAudio Input
: yes (3.5 mm stereo jack with power supply)
Video Output: yes (HDMI Micro Output (Type D))
Supported direct printing methods DPOF
Tripod socket 1/4″
Features and Miscellaneous (HD) SmartZoom digital zoom (magnification factor depends on resolution setting
)Camera does not have low-pass filterISO
extension (with Multiframe NR) up to ISO 102,400ISO video shooting
100-6,400 built-in
lens curtainBIONZ signal processorShake warning indicatorDynamic range optimizationAuto portrait framingShutter speedat aperture settings of 2, 2.8 and 4 maximum 1/2000 secondFlash bracketingDRO bracketing

Size and weight

Weight 482 g (operational)
Dimensions W x H x D 113 x 65 x 70 mm

Other

included accessories Sony AC-UD10 AC AdapterSony
NP-BX1 Special Battery PackUSB Connection CableHarnessCamera SoftwarePicture Motion Browser for Windows (2000/Me/XP)
Camera Software Picture Package Music TransferSPVD-010
USB Device Driver for Windows and Macintosh
optional accessory Sony HVL-F20M Slip-on Flash with Swivel ReflectorSony
NP-BX1 Special Battery Power SupplyRemovable Memory CardCamera Bag
USB
USB 2.0 High Speed

 

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